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Hello from Bavaria

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself!' started by Gromit, Feb 11, 2017.

  1. Gromit

    Gromit Studio Forums Elite
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    Please allow me to introduce myself…

    My name is Peter, I’ve travelled around the sun 42 times now, my home is at the foothills of the Bavarian alps.

    My father started playing around with RC`s when I was 10, and, as you all know, it’s contagious. I started out with a Wild Willy (the first), which is still here, although more dead than alive. After spending a while making static plastic models Revell’s Flower class corvette brought me back to RC’s.

    During a longer stay in New Zealand I picked up some useful skills at the Otago Model Engineering Society and moved towards scratch-building ships and boats. A couple of years ago, an Axial Dingo joined the collection. Very recenty I decided to do something about the various car-wrecks that have been accumulating in my attic. I’m having some outrageous ideas but not much experience modifying cars. In return, I hope to contribute some old-fashioned-technology-buff and model-boating expertise.



    Cheers

    Peter
     
  2. soup

    soup Studio Forums Elite
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    Hi Peter wellcome from another forum newbie.
    Have been promising myself for what seems like years to convert the Matchbox kit of the Flower class corvette HMS Bluebell . The latest edition of this is HMCS Snowberry from Revell with a printed deck. Which version did you convert ? And how did you go about it, was it fairly straightforward, or did it entail advanced techniques .
    I am currently converting a 'toy' boat to use hobby grade R/C

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Radio-Remo...8&qid=1486674900&sr=1-4&keywords=torpedo+boat
    price was NOTHING like that though, it was more like £40-£50, might have been as little as £30 can't really remember was bought for my youngest ten or so years ago, and basically has sat in a cupboard for about nine years of that time.
     
  3. Mark Liersch

    Mark Liersch Studio Forums Elite
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    Welcome from snowy Canada...
     
  4. Gromit

    Gromit Studio Forums Elite
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    Thank you.
    Here's something to laugh and cry: the story of how i learned to walk model-boat-wise.
    My Flower was an all-plastic one. Installing the propshaft, engine and rudder was straightforward. From my experience (which i didn't have back then) I strongly recommend investing in a serious propshaft with a coupling flange that forces the motor- and propeller-shafts into alignment. I connected a misaligned engine to the shaft with a cardan-coupling, which made a hell of a noise, which ruins the joy of watching her sail. Now i usually mount this flange on a block of wood with a gap of about 2-3mm to the hull, which is then filled with silicone. This gives support but does not convey the engine vibration directly to the hull. I had used a Speed 600 engine, which propelled the ship to raceboat-like speeds while overheating, so now i would recommend something like a power 600, which drives my coast freighter (a heavy brute about the same length but more than twice the weight) way beyond scale-speed without breaking sweat.
    What was far more troublesome was to leave part of the deck detachable. The plastic deck was parted at the wavebreakers, and i left the rear part of the fore-deck and the roof of the rear superstructure detachable, as well as a little hatch over the rudder. All of this was far from waterproof (because amateurishly executed), but the Flower prooved very stable and seaworthy. She was designed for the north Atlantic, after all.
    However, ships behave quite differently from trucks (they don't just stop when you let go of the sticks), so she ended under a little jetty, shearing off most of her superstructure. Lots of details had already been gone, since the plastic details are rather flimsy. The hull is still sitting in the attic, among the mentioned "wrecks". Maybe something will become of it, or i might throw it out some day and have a striking idea two days later.
     
    Mark Liersch likes this.

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