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Kit vs rtr

Discussion in 'Newbie Q & A' started by Dribble, Sep 1, 2011.

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What do you prefer?

  1. Kit

    37.6%
  2. RTR

    19.3%
  3. Both

    35.6%
  4. No Preference

    7.4%
  1. Sholos

    Sholos New Member

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    i prefer a rtr over kit because i had a kit and i put it together then about a day or so later things where going wrong so i prefer rtr because i dont have to worry about ruining it, to build it. also i like rtr simply becuase i can add batteries and away i go rcing :)
     
  2. Tallon 1

    Tallon 1 Studio Forums Elite
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    I would say both :/

    RTRs are often cheaper and you dont have to buy much extra stuff and you are ready for fun ,but on the other hand you can assemble Kits like YOU want them but it makes them more expensive ( my Teamc-t4 FTE 700€ so far D: ) but its fun to drive as well.
     
  3. jdkrs19

    jdkrs19 New Member

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    I agree. Nothing is better than what you build.. Unless you're a complete n00bie and mess the whole kit up :p
    @scx10creeper84 You couldn't have worded that quote any better.. "The satisfaction that comes with completing one".
     
  4. Bearccountry

    Bearccountry Studio Forums Elite
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    Kit every day of the year.
     
  5. Brimstone

    Brimstone New Member

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    KIT!! I can't stand not upgrading. Even when I buy a RTR I always buy a crap load of aftermarket parts to go with it and end up tearing into a brand new RC anyway.
     
  6. sickinger

    sickinger Studio Forums Elite
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    I would have to say KIT just because I like ti build them. And at this point you are able to put is stuff that you really want if you are new to the hobby that a kit is a little more money. But you get one that you can start using parts from other cars if you like and so on that why I like it
     
  7. iRex

    iRex New Member

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    In the past I've done RTR so I can get the electronics. I usually end up tearing them down to fix something sooner or later. (or water proofing thanks to medic's video)
     
  8. sgtlunchbox2

    sgtlunchbox2 New Member

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    I think I'm gonna have to go with rte I just finished an Exo terra build and was quite frustrated. The manual wasn't ipdated to what came in the kit. The one thing I think I hated the most was painting the body.
     
  9. dirtsquirrel

    dirtsquirrel New Member

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    i like both. the rtr is flipping cool every thing you need but not a changer or batt. a kit made the way you want and that not everyone has the same thing out there
     
  10. domindart

    domindart Studio Forums Elite
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    RTR. I had my dad build me my kits when I was younger and got into racing, so I've never built one.. would actually like to try it, but for the sake of buying and being able to run immediately I say RTR. I like the simplicity of buying and just running .
     
  11. KellyClarks

    KellyClarks Banned

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    http://www.rctophobby.com The Esky Lama V4 is designed to be the ultimate entry level RC helicopter. Every part of the helicopter has been carefully thought out to make both flying and maintenance as easy as possible. The focus has been on simplifying the build as much as possible by making all parts accessible without having to strip the whole model. Should you have a crash though and break something this simplified design will mean repair times will be much shorter allowing you spend more time flying and less time fixing. Everything you need to start flying is in the box including all batteries chargers and cables!
     
    #91 KellyClarks, Nov 18, 2013
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2013
  12. Seamus_RBNW

    Seamus_RBNW RudeBoyz NorthWest
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    kit bandwagon here too, basically a rtr is to get the tx/rx in my world, once you have those kits are the way to go, everything you do with a kit is yours, not someone elses ideas and imagination, yours and it will show in your choices of paint/graphics/accessories etc, awesome!! use the rtr for what they are intended for, I say!! (getting started in rc)
     
  13. weaslerc

    weaslerc Studio Forums Elite
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    i chose rtr due to pricing and research i have done with axial products. to buy a kit and put all the stock electronics in it that would b in the rtr version of it, it would cost more. all though if money and spare time isn't an issue then kit all the way. i have yet to buy a kit. hopefully after the holidays i will b able to do so.
     
  14. timmer3153

    timmer3153 New Member

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    So i just got a honcho, RTR. and love it. i would love to put together a kit one day, but i think having the RTR now will give me better insight on what i can upgrade on any kit i may do in the future.
     
  15. bubbafica57

    bubbafica57 New Member

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    I like the rtrs so you can get out and drive it as soon as the battery charges. I also like kits cause you can say you put it together and not somebody from a factory.and I prefer both rtr and a kit. Like I said rtr you charge and go kit you can take you time make the truck how you would want as an rtr. And every time I have the money to buy a kit the one I want is always out of stock it's frustrating
     
  16. RCCRummer

    RCCRummer Studio Forums Elite
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    Long reply incoming, but here's my .02! Though it's probably worth even less!

    I've had both, and they both have their places, having said that I prefer kits. I enjoy building and making selections along the way throughout the building process. Yet sometimes the urge to just rip and go is too great, throw your pack on a charger, drop it in and hit the throttle and your off in less than 30 minutes.

    RTR's
    In my past experience (bear in mind a lot has changed in the 12 years I've been away from the hobby) RTR's were great for folks who wanted to backyard bash, and run for fun. It allowed for a very low entry point (price wise) for the hobby, it got them in the door so to speak. Unfortunately many of the folks who bought RTR's didn't know how to work on their vehicles, I'd see this at the track almost every weekend and throughout the week when showing up to practice. They either tossed out or lost the instruction manual, or just never bothered to read it. Some of these folks were the same ones running to RCCA Forums (This was the largest and "main" forum way back in the day!) and do something like this: ZOMG!!!! $350 XXYV SUCKS ITS BROKE!--- Others read the manual's front to back, but still weren't comfortable or feel they didn't have the skill or aptitude to diagnose/fix the problem. RC's for some folks, especially when broken, are just intimidating. Then you start reading up on technical jargon and terms and you can feel really lost, and that's ok! There is usually always someone with experience willing to lend a hand, give advice, or help out and that furthers the promotion of the hobby. [Honestly, it's one of the big reasons I decided to sign up here...I did a lot of reading and lurking around before I even registered. This place has a great sense of community, promoting the hobby and fun, no one rages at the folks for asking questions and there aren't a bunch of trolls running around going "That's what you get for buying XXRA THEY SUCK!!!111".Thank goodness for RCSparks Forums!]

    Now we've all experienced breakage I'm sure, and it's disappointing, frustrating; and all of that, especially on "low mileage" "low hour" vehicles. It's all part of the hobby, stuff breaks, sometimes without any real cause (yeah hitting things at 30+ mph and suffering breakage isn't a part malfunction, it's a driver malfunction!). Yet a lot of decent vehicles and manufacturers got a bad rap (some actually deserved it!) due to this. Ebay was flooded with busted vehicles, some were very simple fixes (Truth be told, I snatched up a ton of cheap vehicles and scavenged 'em for parts and such, but it was still sad to see in a way) and folks "dropped out" of the hobby just as quickly as they entered. Now is this still happening? I can't say, I doubt it is to the extent that it used to occur, but I just don't know.

    Another past RTR issue-"It's cheaper to get an RTR and add upgrades as I want!"--Is it? (I honestly don't know currently, speaking again from past experience) I've seen folks drop $300 for an RTR spend another $200 in "upgrades" and end up burning something up on the first run (are your RTR electronics up to the task, how about that motor?)--Your "kit" depending on the manufacturer (Tamiya was great about this) might have some upgrade parts included with the kit that aren't included with the RTR as well as a "selection" of part options. (IE: Different gears, gearing ratio's, oil/spring weights, etc.) In addition to the fact that if you want to install your "upgrades" your going to end up doing some dis-assembly and re-assembly. (Not all together a bad thing as it will teach you about your vehicle, I'm just of the preference I'd rather install the parts while building the kit!)

    --There's nothing wrong with RTR! For many it is the best option!-However, it can lead to it's own set of problems as the examples I gave might demonstrate. It's all personal preference though, and no one is going to knock you for getting an RTR but if you find yourself needing help---Read the manual, study the parts diagram, learn the part names, it's a big source of "help" on it's own, it will also assist you in communicating with others when you actually have to ask for help.--

    Kits

    Kits--For me, there is nothing better than cutting open the shrink wrap on a box and pulling the lid off and gazing upon all of those shiny bags filled with virgin parts attached to the sprue trees! Ahh the wonderful smell of fresh plastic and mold release! Yes my friends it's a sickness, but a good kind, watch out it can be contagious! There is nothing more satisfying than spending a few hours building a kit, and I usually tried to build kits with other's who maybe weren't as confident or as experienced (this wasn't always feasible, but at my old LHS we'd have build days, I definitely miss my old LHS!).

    Kit's even though I prefer them can come with their own set of problems. Here are a few that I've experienced in the past--Poor instruction manuals! This for me is one of my biggest pet peeve's. Yes RC's are often imports (not always, but usually!) and the instruction manuals can come in many languages often with poor directions or wording and sometimes even worse diagrams, pictures. Sometimes (rarely) they wouldn't even have your native language at all and if the diagrams were poor you could get lost very easily! ARGH! Well, luckily now (today) there's Youtube and perhaps someone's done a step by step build and posted it online, or maybe in a forum you'll find your answer or some assistance in navigating the mess of instructions.

    Missing parts-improper parts--When building a kit it's a good idea before even starting assembly or cutting ANYTHING off of the sprue trees to look at the "Included" section, and lay out all your parts. Make sure you have everything your supposed to before you begin, if you don't you'll have to remedy it one way or another. The very first kit I built myself (back in '95) was a Tamiya Ford F150 "Baja Version" 1/10th based around the TA01/2T chassis. This kit also covered an American Racing Chevy S-10 and Toyota Pre-Runner and later a Mitsubishi Pajero (which soon switched chassis platforms after release) well it had a major issue...Quite a few of these kits made it out of the factory with the wrong shafts and dogbone's for the drive train. They were from an early TA01 platform car and just wouldn't work. Man I was so bummed, this was a major hiccup in getting out and running in the backyard that weekend. So I had a couple of options, I could take it back to the LHS (At the Time, Deb's RC world Chesapeake,Va. and they're still open today years later-WOW!) and hopefully they would give me a set of the right parts and work it out with the vendor (They wouldn't accept a return of a partially assembled kit, I knew that much, plus I really really wanted this truck!) or I could buy a set either the stock set or upgraded parts. The last thing I really wanted to do was contact Tamiya and wait weeks for parts to arrive from either the U.S. warehouse or the Japanese one...but it was an option (Tamiya has/d great parts support/customer service but international shipping blows!). I elected to get some MIP upgrade parts from Deb's, so I wouldn't be delayed in finishing. They were willing to give me the stock parts no charge, but after talking with a local racer and one of the employees (whose name escapes me now, funny what you remember and forget!) I opted for the upgrade, which they gave me a discount on. So back home to get to work and finish.---My long winded story does have a point about kits though, if something is wrong what are your options? Do you have more than one? This is something to think about, and while missing parts/incorrect parts aren't as common, it can still happen yes even today.-- I ran the wheels off that RC...and I was hooked.

    Mistakes in construction and building--Your own undoing! Some of you are likely scratching your head going uhh, what's this guy going on about?
    Have you ever lost a part? Broken a part during assembly? Lost a screw, spring, etc? Assembled a part incorrectly? Yeah it happens and it can cause a headache, hopefully you found the part or there was a spare (usually there are, but not always). These things are often avoided with an RTR, everything is already assembled (usually correctly!) and ready to go. Not so with a kit, and sometimes you can hit a wall when a spring goes flying across the room and you can't find it and there are no spares. How about that transmission casing you over torqued and cracked? (I've been there and done that!) Many of you might be saying, well that's all part of the experience and learning, and I would agree with you 100%. However it's another barrier to entry that can be involved with a kit. *This can and likely will happen to you when doing maintenance on your vehicle at one point or another whether RTR or Kit!* --I've lost, busted and broken more parts than I can care to count much less remember in years past, it happens. Deep breath and find the spare or grab a replacement.

    Time--Kit's take time to build properly (for some not very long at all, for others it may be several hours spread out over a weekend or week), do you have the time or are willing to make it? In my opinion, it doesn't take a lot of time to build most common RC's, but I'm out of practice as well, so I'd imagine if I were to build a kit today it would take me 3-4 hours roughly (minus painting/tuning) depending on the instructions, quality, and what I remember as I'm going along.

    Tuning-This is very kit dependent, some kits come with a large amount of "tunable" parts, others have little or none. Do you know how to check for toe-in/toe-out, camber, caster-How about making adjustments to them? How's your ride height? Do you know how to adjust your shocks, change the preload-etc? (Nitro specific-is your engine running lean or rich?) and a slew of other things, while many kits will offer "advisement" in these areas if they require such things. This is usually just a guideline, and the setup may not be ok for your running surface IE:Running on asphalt vs offroad. Asphalt you can run a lower ride height than you can offroad as an example. it's something that comes with building experience and running time with your chosen platform. Most RTR's don't have many adjustable parts or options for tuning/setup. A kit can have quite a bit (again very kit dependent) needed to setup before you can even drop the battery in and pull the trigger.

    In closing, geesh that was way longer than I intended it to be. If you read all of it, great! If you didn't, yeah really don't blame you. There is no "right" or "wrong" choice. You have to weigh your desires and options, RTR may be great for Fred, but you might find yourself better suited for a kit. So long as your having fun, that's really all that matters! We have hobbies because they're fun and enjoyable. Also no matter what you choose, if you need help ask. The only stupid question is one unasked! If you find yourself wanting to ask something, someone likely has had the same question, so do a quick search, I'll bet you find more than a few answers!For me...Since I'm just returning to the hobby, but I've got past experience, I'll be choosing a kit for my return vehicle. However for my son (who is only 10) he'll be going the RTR route and he can help me with my kit.Best of both worlds if you ask me, and nothing wrong with having your cake and eating it to!
    Cheers!
    ~Rummer
     
    #96 RCCRummer, Dec 22, 2013
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2013
  17. AJW

    AJW Studio Forums Elite
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    This isn't going to be longer than the last one
    It's all about you, your position and the rc itself.
    You: whether your up for the challenge or are happy to get it stick a pack in run then customize after
    Position: do you have the time and the workspace, or are you a noob who will just change a few minor nuts and bolts in the garden or on the trail and never really be bothered to touch it again in the sense of a rebuild or customisation
    The rc itself: does it come with something special as a kit like the wraith kit had aluminium links or does is have tons of changeable parts in a bag for when you want to change and adjust after taking it out of the box straight away for a run, so you decide about the suspension stiffness after reviewing it...
     
  18. al77382

    al77382 New Member

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    Just starting back in but I definitely prefer a kit. I'm very much a tinkerer so enjoy working on and figuring stuff out, add to that the whole 'feeling of accomplishment' thing you get after finishing something and I think it'll make that first run of the completed kit that much more fun.
     
  19. darkside0914

    darkside0914 Studio Forums Elite
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    I agree they should sell kits a lot cheaper than rtr I think they should take the rtr price then subtract the cost of the servo tx/rx esc and motor that comes stock with the rtr since you don't get those in a kit add 5 or 10 percent of that total for profit and let you order the upgrades sepretly or sell them as a package with the kit ill use the scx 10 as an example they should sell the stock kit as a standard kit bone stock no upgrades say for $150 then offer a mid range kit that offers upgraded links axles and such for $250 then a full on high end kit that offers a full aluminum upgrade kit for $350 (you know it doesn't cost them that much to make an scx 10) while still offering the rtr for those that want to plug and play I have no preference for kit or rtr I like both but its actually cheaper to start with an rtr and upgrade as you go well maybe not cheaper but it seems so when you spread out the costs over months or even years
     
    #99 darkside0914, Dec 27, 2013
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2013
  20. Y2daT

    Y2daT Over Powered RC
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    I say both .. with all the pro's and cons mentioned above. depending on the model . if you are on a budget a rtr may get u running for the price of a kit with out the electronics tx and such. other models u may be able to get the bare bones kit then the things to complete it as money allows . either will satisfy the rc addiction .
    .
    But like others I to love to mod things sometimes to the point of failure lol .. I used to have a Xmod rc from radio shack .. the thing will fly with 18v vs the designed 6v setup ... although the extra juice took its toll on the steering servo over time
    the little x mod ran so hard it would blow the tires off the rims ... I gave it to a friend a few years ago and it still works :)
     

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