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Short Course Track Builders Guide

Discussion in 'Short Course' started by RustyWrench, Nov 8, 2014.

  1. RustyWrench

    RustyWrench ...I Always Edit...
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    I have posted up this info a couple of times and thought maybe it's time for a thread or maybe a Stickie. Please feel free to add your input on Short Course building. Tips, Tricks, pictures of your Accomplishments, ect. This is an Open Thread any and all Short Course track discussions are welcome.


    Some things to think about when designing a Short Course track... Lets start with corner styles and what they are used for.

    The first corner style listed here is the Hairpin turn. Almost every racing course and sportscar track has at least one of these. A hairpin turn is often found at the end of a long straight, forcing a driver to slow drastically after a long high speed run. Cars would enter on the left side and turn left for 225 degrees, then exit through the final 45 degree right hand turn. Or vice versa.

    [​IMG]

    The next corner type is the Parabolic turn. Parabolic turns come in two varieties; increasing radius and decreasing radius corners. If the cars were to enter from the left side each turn section they encounter would have an increasing or wider radius. On the other hand, if the cars were to enter from the right side each turn section decreases or tightens.

    [​IMG]

    An increasing radius parabolic turn requires a low entry speed and a progressively faster exiting velocity. The decreasing radius parabolic turn has exactly the opposite consequences, here the car can enter at a higher rate of speed, but must progressively slow as it goes deeper into the turn. Exit speeds from a decreasing radius parabolic turn are much lower than they would be for an increasing radius corner.

    Use an increasing radius parabolic turn when the exit of the turn leads onto a fast straight. A decreasing radius parabolic turn is best used when the section following it is a slow speed section of the course.

    Parabolic turns offer some of the most challenging corner configurations possible. Most track designers try to incorporate both an increasing and a decreasing radius turn somewhere in the circuit to challenge the driver and set the car up for the track section to follow.

    The next type of turn is the Carousel. This type of corner is usually a constant radius turn comprised of the largest turn radius available. Carousel turns provide an excellent means of connecting two long straights without losing too much speed in the turn itself. From a track design standpoint, the carousel turn, much like a hairpin, provides an excellent opportunity to fold the track back on itself without using too much width.

    [​IMG]

    The Sweeping turn, or sweeper as it's often called, is a nice alternative to the standard 90 degree curve. By placing a short straight section between two 45 degree turn sections you can create a turn that is much more interesting and challenging to drive than a standard 90 degree left or right hander.

    [​IMG]

    The overall effect of using a sweeping turn is to create two individual and distinct turns out of a the single 90 degree corner. For added variety you can use different turn radius sizes for the entry and exit as well.

    The dynamics of a changing radius sweeper are the same as those for the Parabolic turn described earlier. If the exit leads onto a fast portion of the track put the larger radius turns at the exit. Conversely, if the exit leads to a slow section of the course place the smaller radius turns at the exit instead.

    The Kink is a gentle bend placed somewhere in the middle of a long straight. A kink forces a driver to lift slightly and then get right back on the power. This type of turn, while deceptively simple can test a driver's skill. Kinks are normally found towards the middle of long, fast straights. Try to make the overall turn radius as gentle as possible so that cars can maintain a high rate of speed both on entry and exit. The idea here is to make the driver lift slightly and then get right back on the throttle. No braking is done for this type of turn, other than the slight slowing of the motor.

    [​IMG]

    The 180° Turn is normally a constant radius curve that joins two fast straights. Cars brake well before the entry and then accelerate through the turn to the exit, but unlike the hairpin turn described earlier, this turn employs larger radius curve sections to allow cars to negotiate it at a much higher rate of speed. From the track design standpoint the 180° turn allows the track designer to fold the racing circuit back upon itself. A short straight section can be added in the middle to create a pair of distinct turns, each with a separate braking zone and exit apex.

    [​IMG]

    A Chicane is normally inserted into a fast straight to slow cars down. Chicane sections have become popular in recent years on real-world race tracks as a safety device to slow ever-faster race car designs.

    [​IMG]

    Unlike the kink described above, a chicane has a distinct braking zone prior to the entry apex, followed by a steady throttle section leading up to the exit apex. A driver can not get back on the throttle until the exit apex is reached. The entry and exit speeds for a chicane can be manipulated by the careful choice of the turn radius sizes you select.

    Classic Esses can be found on almost all of the worlds best known race tracks. This turn's name comes from its "S" shape. Esses, like the chicane mentioned above require heavy braking prior to the entry. Esses work to slow a car down much more though than a simple chicane.

    [​IMG]

    Esses, while often thought of as a single course element, are really two distinct turns placed end-to-end. Like the chicane, the entry and exit sections can be of different radius sizes to better facilitate a transition to whatever type of track section they proceed.

    The Washboard turn is found on many tracks. Racers either love or hate this type of turn. While offering no real-world context they can be found in many track designs. Purists normally avoid this type of turn configuration. Esses or Chicanes are usually a better choice, but it is included here because some racers find it interesting. If you decide to incorporate a washboard turn in your track design don't overdue it, a pair of left-right transitions will be sufficient. This type of turn configuration can become very tedious to negotiate.

    [​IMG]

    The next corner style Bus Stop is actually a series of turns combined to create a distinct course element. cars enter the esses from the top and exit towards the bottom through the chicane section. The Spa-Francorchamps circuit was originally created using public roadways. The Bus Stop section was just that, a bus stop on non-racedays.

    [​IMG]

    The last corner style listed here is a Banked Turn. Banked turns allow a car to travel much faster than they normally would through a flat turn. Banked turns work best when placed before a long straight. This arrangement allows the cars to exit the banked section at a higher rate of speed, and consequently travel down a long straight faster than they would if they exited a flat turn. Placing a banked turn at the end of a long straight does little to improve the speed of a car unless another long straight follows it as well.

    [​IMG]

    A quick note all these corner styles can and are used for on road tracks as well...




    Dean
     
    #1 RustyWrench, Nov 8, 2014
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2017
  2. RustyWrench

    RustyWrench ...I Always Edit...
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    As far as jumps go the what ever the take off ramp angle is the landing ramp angle should be 5 deg. less for example. Take off ramp is 15 deg. landing ramp should be 10 deg. Take off ramp is 30 deg then the landing ramp should be 25 deg. That is if you are using landing ramps. Landing ramps are in my opinion essential for any take off ramp over 20-25 deg. A lot of times you can use the next ramp as a take off and landing ramp. You get the idea. Avoid Cross Over Jumps it can also be dangerous for the marshals. It's a good idea to design your jumps so 1/10 scale can make it over them as well as 1/8 scale.

    Track width. The minimum track with is 4 feet on a small track, 6 feet would be better for a minimum number. The wider the better... The larger the foot print of your track the larger the lanes should be. If you had a large track then you may want the furthest lane from the drivers stand to be 12 feet wide, the next closest lane 10 feet wide followed by 8 and the closest lane 6 feet. The point is to have the vehicles visible and drivable at that distance from the stand. You get the idea.

    Also lane separators, the most popular separator is something called "Big O" it's basically plastic drainage tube, but you could also use a simple dirt burm, plywood, 2X4's whatever is laying around.

    Other things to consider are the lay of the land utilizing the natural taper or slope of the land to give you track an interesting dynamic. Minimizing drainage issues, keeping the water run off in a constant direction to avoid puddling. Soil selection can also help with drainage and traction, most tracks use a sand/clay mixture. But you can use pretty much what ever you want. Also keep in mind a Short Course Track will need some watering during dry spells to help keep the dust down and to maximize traction for race day.

    Now that we have stated most of the basics about the elements that help to make a great track design. We need to consider the footprint. How much area do you have to work with? Are there any natural obstructions? Trees, rock out croppings ect. that need to be worked around. Did you leave enough area around the perimeter to access the track for maintenance or to right vehicles, are there safe zones for officials? Keep the track marshal friendly.

    Don't forget the Drivers Stand. Is it large enough for all the racers to fit comfortably (no rubbing elbows) If it is too close to the front lane you may need to lean out to see your vehicle, this could be a problem when the guy beside you cant see his rig. Is it possible to sun shade the stand? Can the Drivers see all the track easily from all positions on the stand? Don't forget not everyone is 6 feet tall there may be children racing. Will the sun blare into their eyes at any point of the day? Is it possible to place the stand in a way that minimizes these potential issues?

    Think about washrooms, Port-O-Potties. Bleachers for spectators. Access to water.

    I won't get into timing systems, there are a few options out there any where from Stop Watches to Computer run Transponders. AMB would be the only way to go if you want to attract serious racers.

    Also incorporating elevation changes (Don't go too crazy with elevations they can obstruct vision to other areas of the track and can be difficult to marshal) whoops, jumps, table tops, and reverse banking with some of or all the other elements listed and you will have a track people will talk about all over the world...


    Here are some interesting Track Lay Outs

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]
     
    #2 RustyWrench, Nov 8, 2014
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2017
  3. evanmatulina

    evanmatulina Studio Forums Elite
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    I guess i found what i making im my back yard now that there is snow on the ground (only 3 feet :shocked:). Super specific and easy to understand. I'd just make a ramp and say meh that looks about right same with a corner.
     
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  4. RustyWrench

    RustyWrench ...I Always Edit...
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    ...Pictures Added... For your viewing pleasure...




    Dean
     
  5. Redcat Ben

    Redcat Ben Studio Forums Elite
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    nice. Some of these things are actually in my track before I even knew about them.
     
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  6. h2rac3r

    h2rac3r Well-Known Member

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    I planned out a track. Now I just need space to make it.

    Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
     
    #6 h2rac3r, Apr 19, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2017
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  7. RustyWrench

    RustyWrench ...I Always Edit...
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    Did some editing for better clairity and added more information...



    Dean
     
  8. h2rac3r

    h2rac3r Well-Known Member

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    Can you post pics on the side view of ramps so that we can see the degree difference visually? I know it would help me, a 14 yo with the dream of creating his own track soon. And what is a marshall? And it's only going to be me and my one friend racing on this track that I make so would I need the drivers stand? I have a lot of questions regarding the topic of making a race track so could you PM sme so that we can talk more in detail?

    Used Tapatalk
     
  9. RustyWrench

    RustyWrench ...I Always Edit...
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    It may take me awhile to come up with decent jump visuals. But I will see what I can do... The Marshall is the person that rights the vehicles when they flip or crash. You can see the guy in the safety vest is one of the corner marshalls.
    [​IMG]
    The green patches are safe zones for them. He can run across to right a vehicle and hop into the other green zone then when it is safe he can return to his posted position, marked by the cone.

    There are tons of SC Racing videos on You Tube and loads of Pictures on Google Images that you can use for research.

    If it's just you and a couple of friends then you most likely will not have any Marshalls there for you will need to right your own vehicles. So I wouldn't recommend a driver stand in that situation. It would be a pain to run up and down every time you crash or flip. try to design your track so you can see all or most of it with out a stand.



    Dean
     
    #9 RustyWrench, Jun 6, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2017
  10. h2rac3r

    h2rac3r Well-Known Member

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    Thank you. Well, I have the low cg chassis on my Sl2sh so flipping wouldn't be a problem. Over drifting and spinning out would be.

    Used Tapatalk
     
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  11. Greenie

    Greenie VillAge iDioT
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    Heres our current track. Not a SCT dedicated track, run 2wd and 4wd Stock/Mod. But designed to suit[​IMG]
     
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  12. RustyWrench

    RustyWrench ...I Always Edit...
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    I never should have titled this thread as a "Short Course Builders Guide" most of the information here pertains to any track type. Carpet, paved, grass and dirt.

    Awesome... Looks like a carpet track. I wish we could go and run afew laps... Love the wall ride, looks like a ton of fun.



    Dean
     
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  13. Greenie

    Greenie VillAge iDioT
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    SCT are our slowest class(ONLY JUST) so the track is almost designed to suit, cause hay, all the classes need to make it around and be fun.

    The wall ride is MAD fun. thi is a new design the guys made. I havent run it yet :(

    Carpet is great to run, normally consistant grip, tyre wear can be a little aggressive, as we run pin points on it
     
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  14. RustyWrench

    RustyWrench ...I Always Edit...
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    Pin Points only no smoothies or slicks??? Are you using the Z3 or Z4 compound? We ran Proline Primes Clay Compound on OutLaw's carpet track, but we only made it to two races before the season was over. Now we are racing at CAMRC on dirt, using Hole Shots and Double D's for traction. There are afew guys running Electrons with success.



    Dean
     
    #14 RustyWrench, Jun 7, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2017
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  15. Greenie

    Greenie VillAge iDioT
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    Schumacher pins and Proline, and Schumacher staggered for fronts on 2wd buggies, pretty much the best for grip. Any dust(track is in a shed in the middle of a massive paddock) and apparently the slicks just don't match up(personally havent run em).
    Some of the Stadium trucks have experimented with others, but really havent come up with anything better
     
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