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Tales from the boat yard

Discussion in 'Boat Build Projects' started by Gromit, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. Gromit

    Gromit Studio Forums Elite
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    Ahoi shipmates!



    After a serious stock-taking of my appartment I decided I have way too many projects sitting around here that are anywhere between started and almost finished. My new-years-resolution is not to start new projects as long as these are not done. To discourage chickening out I thought I might start a collective thread about the various bits on my slipway.

    Puffin
    [​IMG]
    My steam runabout has gotten a fore saloon and some weather-protection for the pilate

    Kauru
    [​IMG]
    A 1/50 scratch-built coastal freighter. Almost finished, except for the markings, which I had no idea how to make. On a casual stroll through an arts-supply-store I found some calligraphy nib-pens and white ink. It will take some exercise to repair my handwriting (damaged by typing om the computer too much and by neglect). It won’t be as perfect as computer-graphics printed in white on decal-sheets, but it is much more „alive“. After that, Kauru needs some weathering.



    Bugsier 3
    [​IMG]
    A Graupner kit for a 1/32 scale harbour tug I got for christmas a while ago. A picture exists of my father working on it, dated 1987 (with a shock i realize my father on the picture was younger than i am now). I didn’t go on with it, afraid I might botch up my father’s work. 30 years later, I really should get over that insecurity and get cracking.



    Baetis
    [​IMG]
    My first scratch-build of a Bavarian river-barge in 1/50. The rubber-thread rigging is showing signs of aging and she hasn’t been in the water for ages.



    Turbinia
    [​IMG]
    The Victorian-Era ancestor of speed boats. On her last run the deck seal proved very non-water-tight and she ran aground hard when the speed controllers went doolally. Also, the cheap propshafts and couplings cause a lot of vibration and noise, so I want to swop them for something a bit nearer the high end. Maybe even add a third shaft, not really necessary for speed, but three is what the real thing has.



    Booby
    [​IMG]
    Like the Puffin, named after a sea-bird. A prototype for a simple steam-boat. However, the little single cylinder steam engine won’t do if you know what a slightly bigger twin can do. So here is a hull without superstructure which should run quite fast with a little electric engine. I’m thinking about a steampunky yacht.


    P.S.: it's a new day, with new daylight, so i went on a foto-safari. Less atmospheric, but now you can see something.
     
    #1 Gromit, Feb 13, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2018
  2. Polaris425

    Polaris425 Studio Forums Elite
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    those are very cool!
     
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  3. Tombsy

    Tombsy Boat Racing Fanatic
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    Gorgeous gorgeous boats, love the Puffin, I know nothing about steam power but I’ve seen some amazing scratch built stuff on the Mayhem forum.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  4. Gromit

    Gromit Studio Forums Elite
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  5. Tombsy

    Tombsy Boat Racing Fanatic
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    Wow that’s like porn to a machinist :) I see why people scratch build them they are pretty pricy but so are any good motors or engines. I still have my Meccano steam engine from when I was a kid that’s the only experience I have with steam lol.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  6. Gromit

    Gromit Studio Forums Elite
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    Then why do you say you knew nothing about steam power?
    I used to be in a club with a lot of folks who built their own steam engines. Very impressive, but I'm not so sure that it would be much cheaper. It takes a lot of brass, and some machine tools that you don't find in the average hobby workshop (the club had quite a collection of these). Unfortunately I didn't have the time to really get into this (i was busy enough with work and learning how to build boat hulls).
     
  7. Jonbass

    Jonbass Member

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    Those are such great models!
    My father loved ships and I remember seeing him plan out a scratch build. I was a teenager and totally not interested at the time. Now I wonder if any of it is still around at my moms. Funny that I was not really interested then but I would give anything to go back in time to build it with him now...
     
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  8. Antho11

    Antho11 Studio Forums Elite
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    What a nice collection! I have the same problem as you, starting to many new projects before finishing the old ones.
     
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  9. Gromit

    Gromit Studio Forums Elite
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    Thanks for the flowers...

    Jon, I don't know what to say. It strikes a very melancholy chord for me, the regret of missed opportunities. But i also remember that this sort of boat building was not very appealing to my teenage self. What sort of ships was your dad building?

    Meanwhile, over here:

    I'm in a frenzy to get on with a project i haven't even mentioned yet: the yet unnamed sailboat built from an Aeronaut Kit. I started her on boxing day (seems to be a tradition, should in this case be called Unboxing Day).

    It's a laser-cut wood kit, but takes pretty much the same steps i use for my scratch builds. It all started with mounting the frames on a board upside down

    [​IMG]
    There is a lot of brain-grease in that kit: all the frames have extensions so they can be mounted this way to produce a robust framework before the planks hold everything together. It comes with a depron sheet with the frame positions exactly marked, but i backed that with a serious shelf-board for stiffness. There are even slots in the frame-extensions where the planks fit in so it's easier to clamp them on while the glue sets. These needed a little work since the planks need a little more room here they don't run at a right angle to the frames.

    It's all very precisely cut, which is nice in one way, but on the other hand, every 1/2mm that you sway is bound to come back and bite you (more of that later).

    [​IMG]
    This is what it looked like on thursday, shortly before the mishap that set off the frenzy.

    Let me explain: the varnish i use soaks nicely into the wood, the next coat slightly dissolves the previous one so it soaks in again and gives a very nice finish that still has some wood texture. If you wait too long between coats, this will not happen and the last coat will remain visible as a layer.
    Now the deck consists of an outward frame, some strips and some inward parts. All this is (contrary to the instructions) assembled on the hull and the underside painted in advance, because it'll soon be unaccessible. The upper side of the deck I left unpainted to avoid the "layer" effect of the varnish. I wanted to sand and varnish the deck after it was all mounted.
    HOWEVER, when I was preparing the glue (epoxi as everything was already painted) to put on the deck frame, I somehow managed to lay the deck (unpainted upside downwards) into the glue!!! So I decided to "paint" the whole upside in epoxi glue and flip the deck over. This means that I had a part of varnished deck that needed it final finish in just a few days time.

    [​IMG]
    The decks are fitted

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Like the friendly voice in the London Underground suggested, I do mind the gap. That's the kind of situation that happens when the precisely cut hull sides are fitted a smidgeon too low. In a scratch build, i would make them a bit larger and than trim them back. No way to fix this here, so I covered it up with a bumper strip (which most of my boats have, not because they all need covering-up, but because it's a nice way to merge the deck and the hull sides).

    [​IMG]
    To fit bumper strips:
    1: prepare strips
    2: stick sticky tape to hull
    3: super-glue little wedges (usually used for laying tiles, one of the most useful accessories in my workshop) to tape. These keep the strip from sliding away.
    4: glue on the strips
    5: trim the ends

    So finally, while I type this, the first coat of varnish is drying. So i cursed quite a lot when I realized the deck lying in the glue, but I don't think I would have a deck on her right now if everything had gone according to plan.

    I'm looking forward to rent an electric boat in summer and sail this alongside.
     
    #9 Gromit, Feb 17, 2018
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2018
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  10. Gromit

    Gromit Studio Forums Elite
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    Some more coats of paint have dried now and it all starts to come together.

    [​IMG]
    The cockpit. It remains detachable so you can maintain the rudder mechanism

    [​IMG]
    The cabin-roof planking is drying

    [​IMG]
    The mast-base that came with the kit. It would look better if the parts were aligned properly and the laser-cut edges sanded off, but it is still made from the same coarse plywood as the interior framework, so i was rather unhappy with it, didn't know what to do with it colour-wise. So i decided to dump it and do some filing and soldering:

    [​IMG]
    A very classic pond-yacht mast base, with three possible positions for the mast

    [​IMG]
    The rudder is from three layers of plywood and then sanded to shape. I don't think I can paint this with anything else than clear varnish.
     
  11. Antho11

    Antho11 Studio Forums Elite
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    Each photo you post pushes me closer to buying a boat kit.
     
  12. Gromit

    Gromit Studio Forums Elite
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    Thanks a lot!

    Antho, is this a good or a bad thing?
     

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